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Rani Patel In Full Effect

Booklist Online 1 Stars
Debut author Sonia Patel offers a unique perspective in Rani, whose punchy first-person narrative, peppered with early-’90s hip-hop references, Hawaiian, Hawaiian pidgin, Gujurati phrases, and her own slick rhymes packed with an empowering feminist message, commendably and strikingly stands out in the YA landscape.
As the only Indian girl in her entire Hawaiian town, 16-year-old Rani often feels like an outsider. She finds some comfort and empowerment in rap and slam poetry, and when she learns about an underground hip-hop crew in her town, it seems like she’s finally found the perfect respite from her home life, which is marred by her parents’ intensely traditional marriage, her father’s brazen infidelity, and — worst of all — the lingering trauma of the sexual abuse her father inflicted on Rani for years. That’s a lot for her to handle, but when Mark, the older man who runs the hip-hop crew, starts taking special interest in her, it seems like he's the perfect solution to her problems, despite her friends’ warnings. Debut author Patel offers a unique perspective in Rani, whose punchy first-person narrative, peppered with early-’90s hip-hop references, Hawaiian, Hawaiian pidgin, Gujurati phrases, and her own slick rhymes packed with an empowering feminist message, commendably and strikingly stands out in the YA landscape. While Rani’s recovery from her trauma is unrealistically speedy and conclusive — something Patel, a psychiatrist, freely admits in her author’s note — most teens won’t skip a beat, since Rani's voice, oscillating from righteous anger to thrilling pride, swooning crushes, and heartbreaking insecurity, will resonate with many, even those with little to no familiarity with Rani’s background. Vivid, bold, and passionate.
- August 8, 2016  Visit Website
Kirkus Reviews 1 Stars
A powerfully particular, 100 percent genuine character commands this gutsy debut.
Rani Patel, daughter of Gujarati immigrants, feels isolated for more than one reason on the Hawaiian island of Molokai in 1991.Readers first meet Rani as she shaves her head following her discovery of her father's affair with a "barely out-of-adolescence homewrecker." That this is the traditional gesture of a widow takes on ever greater significance as the story progresses. Her mother distant, her crush on the handsome, (mostly) Native Hawaiian Pono unrequited, Rani's only comfort is in hip-hop and the rhymes she lays down—until Mark, a hot, older haole who works at a nearby resort and patronizes her family's convenience store, shows some interest in her slam poems and in her. When, as MC Sutra, Rani's invited to audition for hip-hop club 4eva Flowin', she finds community—and complication. Rani relates her tale in an energetic, often wry present-tense account that effortlessly enfolds unitalicized Hawaiian and Gujarati as well as Hawaiian pidgin and hip-hop slang; import if not exact meaning should be clear to readers, and a glossary fills in the gaps. Rap's political side is, like Rani, "in full effect," as she takes on some of the traditions that have critically injured her family in electric slam poems. Author Patel is a psychiatrist, and a concluding note explains that although Rani's recovery from incest is unrealistically speedy, it can stand as a model for victims. A powerfully particular, 100 percent genuine character commands this gutsy debut.

- July 15, 2016  Visit Website
Publishers Weekly 1 Stars
Sonia Patel sets her powerful debut novel in 1991, filling it with bygone rap references and an electric verbal blend of Gujarati, slang, Hawaiian pidgin, and the rhymes Rani crafts. Patel compassionately portrays Rani’s entangled emotions, lack of self-confidence, and burgeoning sense of empowerment as she moves forward from trauma.
Rani Patel, a Gujarati Indian teenager working in her family’s restaurant and convenience store on the Hawaiian island of Moloka’i, has been sexually abused by her father, something the 16-year-old has kept secret from her overworked and withdrawn mother. With her father’s new girlfriend in the picture, Rani struggles with her identity, shaving her head and flirting with the much older Mark, despite warnings from her friend Omar and crush Pono. Invited to perform for an underground rap group, Rani finds validation through her alter ego, MC Sutra, as she becomes the first female rapper on the island. Meanwhile, she and her mother search for the strength to reject the harmful men in their lives and form a stronger bond between themselves. Patel sets her powerful debut novel in 1991, filling it with bygone rap references and an electric verbal blend of Gujarati, slang, Hawaiian pidgin, and the rhymes Rani crafts. Patel compassionately portrays Rani’s entangled emotions, lack of self-confidence, and burgeoning sense of empowerment as she moves forward from trauma.
- August 1, 2016  Visit Website
School Library Journal 1 Stars
[Rani’s] story will appeal to readers who prefer gritty, darker fiction without a pat, happy ending, and characters who don’t always overcome their challenges but must face them repeatedly. A strong, unique choice for YA collections.
Rani Patel in Full Effect by Sonia Patel | SLJ Review
On Molokai in the early 1990s, Rani Patel lives the life of the ultimate outsider. A quiet class council member of Indian descent whose relationship with her parents is deeply dysfunctional, she takes comfort only in hip-hop and rap. Her unrequited crushes on two local guys lead her into the underground rap scene, where she tests her skills as MC Sutra, but as she begins to forge an identity, her family and romantic relationships threaten to pull her under. Rani is a flawed character whose poor choices make her somewhat unlikable but also reflect a realistic reaction to her troubled family past—her mother ignores her, and her father sees her as a wife replacement (the book contains instances of incest). The teen seeks love and acceptance wherever she can find it, and through rap she is able to express her struggles and discover a community that embraces her unreservedly. The dialogue, which incorporates a bit of Hawaiian pidgin, Gujarati, and hip-hop slang, can require the use of the included glossary but enhances the understanding of Rani’s place at the convergence of multiple cultures. Her story will appeal to readers who prefer gritty, darker fiction without a pat, happy ending, and characters who don’t always overcome their challenges but must face them repeatedly. VERDICT A strong, unique choice for YA collections. –Marian McLeod, Convent of the Sacred Heart, Greenwich, CT
This review was published in the School Library Journal October 2016 issue.
- October 10, 2016  Visit Website
The Globe and Mail
You haven’t heard this voice in YA before.
You haven’t heard this voice in YA before. It’s 1991 and 16-year-old Rani is an Indian girl living on the Hawaiian island of Moloka’i. She’s plagued by the deep trauma that has resulted from her parents’ arranged marriage and repeated sexual abuse by her father. But Rani is a survivor. She finds solace, renewal and forward momentum in writing and performing rap about misogyny and damaging cultural norms. This is a robust debut by Sonia Patel, a Stanford-educated psychiatrist who lives and works in Hawaii, and one that is not watered down for mass-market consumption. An extensive six-page glossary helps decode the Hawaiian and Gujarati slang, guiding readers through the singular experience of a girl who raps, “I rhyme about being free/cuz I am trying to be/the change I want to see.”
- December 30, 2016  Visit Website
BookPage
Rani’s environment leaps off the page in vivid and satisfying detail, from the winding roads and small shops of Moloka’i to the intricacies of ’90s hip-hop fashion. … Author Sonia Patel is a psychiatrist, and her determination to portray Rani’s response to trauma truthfully is unrelenting.
Rap like a girl

Sixteen-year-old Rani Patel is part of the only Indian family — Gujarati, to be precise — on the Hawaiian island of Moloka’i. And that family is falling apart. When Rani discovers her father’s affair, he is unrepentant. After years of unquestioning obedience, Rani’s mother finally finds the strength to kick him out. Feeling abandoned by her father and invisible to her mother, Rani deals with it all through the music that has always saved her: rap. Rani’s deep love of hip-hop culture empowers her to write lyrics and slam poems full of swagger, female empowerment and social awareness. But while her alter ego, MC Sutra, exudes confidence, Rani has yet to confront the horrific truth of her relationship with her father. As she hones her skills as an MC and a flirtatious relationship with an older man becomes something more, Rani’s past continues to intrude on her present.

Rani’s environment leaps off the page in vivid and satisfying detail, from the winding roads and small shops of Moloka’i to the intricacies of ’90s hip-hop fashion. The lyrics she writes are particularly convincing — good enough to show that her talent is serious, but just unpolished enough to be written by a teenager. Author Sonia Patel is a psychiatrist, and her determination to portray Rani’s response to trauma truthfully is unrelenting. Rani’s past affects her choices again and again, despite her undeniable intelligence and drive.

As young readers root for Rani, they will gain a deeper understanding of abuse and addiction through this powerful and gripping novel.

—By Annie Metcalf, BookPage
- October 1, 2016  Visit Website
Rich In Color
Rani Patel’s story spoke to me with power and intensity. I felt Rani’s pain, but also her energy, determination and her hope for healing … Get it soon especially if you enjoy references to 90s hip-hop.
When Rani’s father leaves her mother for another woman, Rani shaves her head in mourning. The visibility of her act of rebellion propels her onto the stage as a hip-hop performer and into a romantic relationship with a man who is much older. The whirlwind romance, coming on the heels of her father’s abandonment, make her begin to understand how her father’s sexual abuse wounded her in deeper ways than she, or her mother, have ever been able to acknowledge.

Meanwhile, she seeks solace in making lyrics and performing as well as in her boyfriend’s arms. Rani’s friends warn her about him but she fails to listen, feeling as though she finally has something and somebody that makes her feel good about herself—not recognizing that her own talent in hip-hop makes her feel secure, smart, and confident in ways her boyfriend does not. Indeed, as the relationship continues, Rani discovers her boyfriend’s drug use and falls victim to his abuse. Losing herself just as she finds herself, Rani discovers her need to speak out against those who would silence her—no matter the personal danger it leads her into.

Review: Rani is a Gujarati teen living in Hawaii and she’s struggling. She’s an outsider at school for the most part, but home is even worse. She feels abandoned by her father and shut out by her mother. One way Rani deals with the pain is through writing raps. When she’s rapping as MC Sutra, she has confidence and even though she’s pretending, Rani convinces herself along with everyone else. She explains it this way:

It’s the me
I want to be
the large and in charge person
I want the world to see
So I MC, and throw down
my self-confidence decree
and strive to be
my own queen bee

In her day-to-day life, Rani cannot see her own value. She’s unable to understand her worth without her father’s attention. For years she had measured her self-worth by his actions and words. When he not only leaves, but lavishes his attention on someone else, Rani is devastated. This is not a book filled with sweetness and light. Rani is violated, thrown aside and left wounded. There are some very raw scenes to get through, but readers also get to see Rani step out in powerful ways as she learns about herself and her strengths.

Her emotional journey is compelling. Rani survived abuse at the hands of her father and is working to change her patterns of behavior. She doesn’t want to seek his approval anymore. With him in another relationship, that becomes easier to a certain degree, but she falls into the same habits with her new, much older boyfriend.

During this trying time, Rani is not only moving away from her father, she’s attempting to close the gap with her mother. She wants love, comfort and support from her mother, but these things aren’t often given. The years of isolation have put a wedge between the two and change is slow to come. Rani has complex emotions. She feels a sense of guilt because of her relationship with her father and feels sorry for her mother. She also can’t help but be angry that her mother didn’t keep her safe over the years whether that was through ignorance, fear, or something more deliberate. I found their changing relationship intriguing. I was a little surprised at how quickly some things resolved, but thought things developed in a logical way.

Rani has very few friends, but the ones she has are extremely supportive. They’re close, but they are hiding several things from her. She has a much older boyfriend, but one of her friends is also someone she fantasizes about so those relationships get complicated.

Aside from the abusive relationship, mother/daughter issues, friends, boyfriends, and hip-hop music there was another added layer – activism. This is extremely timely with the issues surrounding the Dakota Access pipeline. Rani, her father and many other people are working to protect the water supply on their island home which involves a fight against a proposed pipeline. Native Hawaiian sovereignty is also part of the discussion. I appreciated the inclusion of the activism because it added depth to the characters and the story line. This may be one layer too many for some readers, but I’m glad it’s part of the story.

Recommendation: Get it soon especially if you enjoy references to 90s hip-hop. I think I missed the effect of some of those references, but Rani Patel’s story still spoke to me with power and intensity. I felt Rani’s pain, but also her energy, determination and her hope for healing.
- September 9, 2016  Visit Website
Kirkus Reviews
It’s a book that is honest and realistic about how hard it is to come to terms with abuse: how willing and even eager we are to accept excuses and rationalizations, to forgive and give abusers "another chance"; of how much harder it is to see from the inside than the outside.
Finding a Voice
By Leila Roy

This was my evolution
into rap elocution nonviolently battling persecution
putting misogynists in verbal correctional institutions
call my solution a female revolution
retribution in the form of rhyme electrocution
my underground contribution…

—Rani Patel in Full Effect, by Sonia Patel

One day, out of the blue, twelve-year-old Rani Patel’s father came home and said to Rani and her mother, “I’m moving to Moloka’i. Come if you want.” He left the next day. Rani and her mother, by themselves, sold their Connecticut home, packed up their belongings, said goodbye to their friends and family and tightknit Gujarati community, and followed him to Hawaii.

Now, four years later, Rani has had suspicions about her father’s infidelity for quite some time. He’s been strangely distant, he comes home late—or not at all—and a little while back, she saw him buying roses, and she can’t remember him ever buying flowers for her mother. As the book opens, Rani’s suspicions have been proved entirely, undeniably correct—and that information changes everything she has ever understood about her family, her parents, and her own place in the universe.

Through words and song—Rani loves rap and hip-hop, and she aspires to perform, to hold an audience rapt with her truths—she begins to unpack her reaction to the implosion of her parents’ marriage, and more specifically, her relationship with her father. His recent distance has allowed her to finally begin to process the sexual abuse that she has endured over the last ten years—but her identity and her self-worth has been so wrapped up in who she is in relation to an older man for so long that she isn’t sure how to see herself as an individual.

That is a LOT of background, especially for a book that’s only a little over 200 pages long! But there’s so much going on in this book that it’s necessary.

It’s about gender and power dynamics and sexism, about how sexism is not only supported within culture, but built into its framework. It’s about the emotional and psychological effects of incest: about how a victim of incest can be scared of her abuser, ashamed of the abuse, angry about the abuse; but also crave the attention of the abuser, feel special about being singled out, feel jealous when his attention turns elsewhere. Patel writes about the complexity of Rani’s feelings about her father with such nuance and empathy—she knows what he’s done to her is wrong, but now that he’s gone, she still misses him.

It’s about cultural isolation, in terms of being The Only One:

Because first of all, everyone on Moloka’i knows I’m not Hawaiian. I’m the only Gujarati girl on the island. Second, guys never notice me. Pretty lady? Gorgeous hair? What was he talking about? Moloka’i boys won’t even look at me. To the fine local studs my age, I’m a sixteen-year-old dorky four-eyed flat-chested curry-eating non-Hawaiian nobody.

And it’s about the isolation that often comes hand-in-hand with sexual abuse, in that the abuser discourages—and sometimes outright sabotages—his victim’s friendships and relationships with other people:

Only thing missing—a girlfriend partner in crime. I wish and sigh. Driving alone, I’m left with my thoughts. Then again that’s nothing new. Rani, my princess, I need you. Why do you need friends?

Her inability to connect with women is striking and heartbreaking—except for her mother, almost every woman she interacts with is seen as a rival—and the Author’s Note, in which Patel talks about that disconnect as one of the most common psychological effects of incest, makes it even more so. It’s a book that is honest and realistic about how hard it is to come to terms with abuse: how willing and even eager we are to accept excuses and rationalizations, to forgive and give abusers ‘another chance’; of how much harder it is to see from the inside than the outside. Readers who get frustrated with Rani’s desire for her father’s company—and with her choices in regards to Mark, the much-older and clearly-troubled man that she gets involved with—would do well to read Patel’s Note.

The setting—1991 Moloka’i—is an integral part of the story: in terms of all of the thinking Rani does while driving back-and-forth across the island multiple times a day; in terms of the solace and calm she gets from the landscape. It hits on the long term effects of colonialism on culture and religion and economy; it deals with addiction in terms of how it affects people, families, and the larger culture; it deals with politics and protest and community action.

I’ve saved Rani’s voice for last, because in a book that deals with a whole lot of hard stuff, her voice is a joy. Not only is she entirely open about her appreciation for beauty and totally willing to own her sexual appetite—it’s rare that I find a heroine in YA who refers to herself as ‘horny’—but the way in which she expresses said sexual thoughts is often cheerfully, hilariously lusty:

He’s wearing low-riding boardshorts. Nothing else. I’m envisioning washing some clothes on his abs when he passes me the headphones.

And while the excerpt at the beginning is from one of the songs that she worked out, over time, in her notebook, she’s also prone to mentally freestyling to herself:

Clutching my notebook close to my chest
as if it’s a question-proof vest
boy, you got me stressed
and mentally undressed
with your direct requests
I’m about to put myself under house arrest
lest you guess I’m
messed up and depressed.


Her narration and dialogue is a mix of English, Gujarati, Hawaiian, Hawaiian pidgin, and slang, and—joy of joys—Patel and publisher Cincos Puntos didn’t italicize the non-English words. As I’ve said before, I’m really happy to see publishers and authors moving in that direction—it’s true to the voice and perspective of the character, rather than an attempt to cater to an assumed monolingual audience. I have no knowledge of Gujarati, Hawaiian, or Hawaiian pidgin, but there were plenty of contextual clues that allowed me to pick up the general meaning—and in cases where I missed some nuance, well, that’s on me for my own ignorance, and gives me all the more reason to keep learning.

Pair with: Girl in Pieces, by Kathleen Glasgow, another extremely strong 2016 debut about a girl trying to find her way and her voice, who, like Rani, enters into an ultimately hurtful relationship with a much older man.
- Leila Roy, October 3, 2016  Visit Website
Anderson’s Bookshop
This book is so amazing and incredibly well-written and unique, and there is no punch left unpunched. This book gutted me. Sonia Patel knocked it out of the f*cking park. Buy this book.
This book is so amazing and incredibly well-written and unique, and there is no punch left unpunched. This book gutted me. Sonia Patel knocked it out of the f*cking park. Buy this book.
- Rachelle Strolle, September 7, 2016 
Midwest Book Review
Rani Patel In Full Effect by child and adolescent psychiatrist Sonia Patel is an extraordinary and deftly crafted novel that will have particular and special appeal to young readers ages 12 to 18.
Almost seventeen, Rani Patel appears to be a kick-ass Indian girl breaking cultural norms as a hip-hop performer in full effect. But in truth, she’s a nerdy flat-chested nobody who lives with her Gujarati immigrant parents on the remote Hawaiian island of Moloka’i, isolated from her high school peers by the unsettling norms of Indian culture where “husband is God.” Her parents’ traditionally arranged marriage is a sham. Her dad turns to her for all his needs — even the intimate ones. When Rani catches him two-timing with a woman barely older than herself, she feels like a widow and, like widows in India are often made to do, she shaves off her hair. Her sexy bald head and hard-driving rhyming skills attract the attention of Mark, the hot older customer who frequents her parents’ store and is closer in age to her dad than to her. Mark makes the moves on her and Rani goes with it. He leads Rani into 4eva Flowin’, an underground hip hop crew — and into other things she’s never done. Rani ignores the red flags. Her naive choices look like they will undo her but ultimately give her the chance to discover her strengths and restore the things she thought she’d lost, including her mother. Rani Patel In Full Effect by child and adolescent psychiatrist Sonia Patel is an extraordinary and deftly crafted novel that will have particular and special appeal to young readers ages 12 to 18. While very highly recommended, especially for high school and community library YA Fiction collections, it should be noted for personal reading lists that Rani Patel In Full Effect is available in hardback, paperback and Kindle formats.
- December 1, 2016  Visit Website
"Rani writes words. Words that go boom."
This book is an open wound. Sonia Patel does not sugar coat...heartbreak, sorrow, and patriarchy, the kinds of things intended to bend and break girls who rap. Girls like Rani. But Rani writes words. Words that go boom. And in Rani Patel in Full Effect, so does Patel.
This book is an open wound. Sonia Patel does not sugar coat...heartbreak, sorrow, and patriarchy, the kinds of things intended to bend and break girls who rap. Girls like Rani. But Rani writes words. Words that go boom. And in Rani Patel in Full Effect, so does Patel.
- Isabel Quintero, author of Gabi, A Girl in Pieces, March 1, 2016 
Bustle
One of the best new YA novels to enjoy with your apple cider.
Best New YA Novels Coming in October 2016 to Enjoy With Your Apple Cider
Rani Patel is a kickass, girl-power hip hop performer, but that's her secret life. As the daughter of Gujarati immigrants, she's been taught to believe that "husband is God," and has to live under their cultural norms on a remote Hawaiian island. However, things get even more complicated when Rani meets Mark, a man nearly her dad's age who patronizes her parents' convenience store, who offers her an opportunity to perform in an underground club. Red flags abound, but it's just one piece of Rani's journey of understanding her family, her past, who she is, and who she wants to be.
- September 29, 2016  Visit Website
Cleaver Magazine
Rani Patel, MC Sutra herself, is so much more than a character on the page. … Rani shows us the power every girl has inside themselves to break the cycle of abuse and reminds us that self love is what frees us up to become the amazing beings we are.
In her debut young adult novel Rani Patel in Full Effect, Sonia Patel takes us back to the era of faded box cuts, high-top Adidas, and gold chains as thick as your wrist; to the era where hip-hop reigned supreme and rhymes flowed out of boom boxes like water down Moaula Falls.

The year is 1991, and here we meet Rani Patel, a straight-A student council president by day and an emerging rapper under the stage name MC Sutra by night. In a one-of-a-kind mixture of nineties slang, pidgin Hawaiian, and traditional Gujarati, Rani’s story is told from a perspective that’s undeniably fresh and unapologetically raw.

From the very beginning the book ensnares you with a powerful scene of Rani shaving her head after seeing her father with another woman. As her tears fall so, too, does all of her hair, giving herself the Indian mark of a widow. Her father once meant everything to her, and she meant everything to him—or so she thought. He lovingly called her his princess, and for a time they were nearly inseparable. With her father now out of the picture Rani turns to the one thing she can count on: rap.

For Rani, rap is more than just the kind of music she listens to. It comforts her amidst her mother and father’s constant fighting, it’s there when her father isn’t giving her his undivided affection, and it soothes her during her loneliest moments. The lyrics of famous rappers like Run DMC, Queen Latifah, LL Cool J, and De La Soul help Rani make the best out of her difficult situation. In time, Rani gets the courage to put pen to paper and let her emotions loose on the page. By writing lyrics of her own she channels her thoughts into raps that express her sorrows, her fears, and the triumph she hopes to achieve at the end of it all. “Rap saved my life yo. And it’s been saving me ever since.”

When Rani receives a mysterious note inviting her to an underground rap society called 4eva Flowin’, she’s offered the chance to finally showcase her rapping prowess. With the help of of her friends and fellow 4eva Flowin’ members, Pono and Omar, Rani takes to the stage. As MC Sutra, Rani channels an inner strength she never knew she had. With the mic in her hand and rhymes on her tongue, Rani becomes her truest self on the stage. During those moments she is a powerful force, she can stand up to her father’s abuse, condemn him for his infidelity, and critique a culture that dictates a woman’s worth is determined by the men around her.

Isolated wife, his alone—he’s deprivin’
He got no love for her—cuz his ego lackin’
Wife a commodity—mirror crackin’
Had a kid to appease the masses, curry—curry culture
Raise her as your boo—perverse nurture…
…descended from his slaughter
me and a thousand other daughters.


As MC Sutra becomes increasingly involved with 4eva Flowin’ so, too, does Rani’s involvement with its founder, Mark. Despite warnings from Omar, Pono, and some of the 4eva Flowin’ crew, Rani can’t help but fall head-over-heels for him. Mark showers her with love, affection, and attention—the main things that are lacking in her life ever since her father left. Rani feels complete when she is with Mark, she is his queen, and she craves his love like batu (the Hawaiian slang term for crystal meth). Yet, as their relationship grows into something more serious, she notices the parallels between Mark’s love and her father’s, a harbinger of what’s to come. Despite the signs that point to danger, Rani finds it hard to practice what MC Sutra preaches.

Sonia Patel combines her past experiences and her love of hip hop with her formal training as a psychiatrist to tell Rani’s story. With a command of language that even the most seasoned of writers would envy, Patel tackles these difficult topics with ease. Through Rani, Patel addresses sexual abuse among women, a topic that many people tend to avoid. Patel explores it head on, revealing the ways in which different cultures perpetuate this behavior and how society places a stigma upon those unfortunate to have suffered through it. Patel masterfully examines this unavoidable truth and invites readers to think critically about these issues while giving them a story worth reading.

Rani Patel, MC Sutra herself, is so much more than a character on the page. As I read this book I thought of all the young girls, including myself at her age, looking for love in all the wrong places, whose experiences with their fathers shape their future interactions with men. Rani shows us the power every girl has inside themselves to break the cycle of abuse and reminds us that self love is what frees us up to become the amazing beings we are. —Kristie Gadson

To my ladies it’s up to you—
Stay strong through this life like you’re bamboo.
His control ain’t love, do not misconstrue…
Stand up to the persecution
and make your contribution.

- October 28, 2016  Visit Website
The Riveter Magazine
One of our favorite reads this fall is marketed for young adults, but make no mistake: Rani Patel in Full Effect will hit you just as hard, if not harder, than any “adult” title.
One of our favorite reads this fall is marketed for young adults, but make no mistake: Rani Patel in Full Effect will hit you just as hard, if not harder, than any “adult” title. When her father leaves, 17-year-old Rani finds solace in hip-hop and a much older man. As she develops her music, she also develops her voice to speak out about abuse.
- February 1, 2017 

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